What to Cook with Your Kids When You’re All Stuck at Home

Whether you’re facing a bout of snow days, a widespread virus, or anything else that’s forcing you inside with your little ones for days at a time, here’s a list of 37 recipes you can easily make together to keep everyone happy and entertained. (Look for the * for recipes that are especially baby- and toddler-friendly!)

Recipes to Cook With Your Kids

Breakfast

A finished dish full of Make-Ahead Breakfast Enchiladas.
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“Feed-a-Crowd” Make-Ahead Breakfast Enchiladas

Coconut Vanilla Chia Pudding Parfait

Coconut Chocolate Chip Banana Bread

Date “Shake”

Healthy Carrot Cake Pancakes*

Hidden Veggie Acai Bowls*

Kid-Approved Breakfast Banana Splits

Make-Ahead Freezer Oatmeal Cups with Maple and Brown Sugar are the perfect healthy breakfast for busy mornings on-the-go.

Make-Ahead Freezer Oatmeal Cups with Maple and Brown Sugar

Oat Milk Chia Pudding with Blueberry-Orange Compote*

Peanut Butter Banana Breakfast Cookies*

Red, White and Blueberry Blender

Slow Cooker Superfood Oatmeal

Slow Cooker Cherry Pie Oatmeal

Pumpkin Carrot Muffins*

Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal Cups*

Weekday Festive Funfetti Waffles

Lunch

Protein-Packed Healthy Chicken Waldorf Salad is the perfect quick-and-healthy lunch for any day of the week.

Protein-Packed Healthy Waldorf Chicken Salad

Quick-and-Healthy Tuna Salad Sandwiches

Thai Chicken Burritos

Snacks/Sides

An overhead shot of Festive Guacamole in a bed of tortilla chips.

Festive Guacamole with Cotija and Pomegranate

To-Die-For Candied Bacon Deviled Eggs

Cheddar and Chive Brazilian Cheese Bread*

Cheesy BBQ Garlic Bread

Pumpkin Popovers

Cranberry, White Bean and Grain Salad

Crunchy Pea Salad with Prosciutto

S'mores Granola Clusters | CaliGirl Cooking

Addicting S’mores Granola Clusters

All-Dressed Party Mix

Chocolate Chip-Sunflower Seed Butter Protein Bars

Dinner

This Loaded Mediterranean Hummus Board features slow-cooked pulled lamb, pomegranate arils and refreshing sliced cucumber to make the perfect healthy appetizer for your next get-together!

Loaded Mediterranean Hummus Board

Bruschetta Bar

Weeknight Beef & Veggie Stir-Fry

Eggplant Parmesan Bread Pudding

Ground Beef “Not-So-Sloppy” Joes*

Island-Style Teriyaki Beef Sliders

Dessert

5-Ingredient Indulgent Date Bites

Banana, Peanut Butter and Dark Chocolate “Faux-Yo”

Ways to Get Your Kid Involved in the Cooking Process

You may be thinking, “Sure, these recipes are all great, but how do I actually get my kid(s) involved?” Here are a few ideas for different ages:

A toddler and mom baking together at the kitchen counter.

Toddlers

  • Let them add ingredients to a mixing bowl
  • Have them stir ingredients in a mixing bowl
  • Let them space things out on a baking sheet
  • Allow them to prepare simple ingredients, like cutting softer items with toddler-friendly knives or shelling peas or edamame
  • This is a great time to give them a pair of tongs and let them practice their hand-eye coordination by trying to grab something
  • Have them squeeze citrus
  • TIP: Pre-measure out all your ingredients before starting to cook or bake with your toddler. Things will run much more smoothly this way!

Younger Kids

  • Have them measure out your ingredients for you
  • Allow them to prep your baking vessel – whether by spraying on cooking spray or lining a cupcake tin with muffin liners
  • Continue to allow them to cut things using age-appropriate knives
  • Let them pour things into a vessel through a funnel
  • Have them wash produce
  • Ask them to retrieve ingredients out of the refrigerator or pantry for you

Older Kids

  • Have them dice or mince ingredients for you
  • Let them go through the entire process of adding ingredients, stirring and transferring to the proper cooking vessel
  • Teach them how to safely use the oven and stove
  • Allow them to come up with the menu for a meal!
  • Let them season meat and teach them about proper raw food handling techniques

I’d love to hear your favorite recipes or tips for cooking with kids in the comments below!

 

The Easiest Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal Cups

These Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal Cups are baby- and toddler-approved, but great for the whole family! Make them in advance and stick them in the freezer to have a healthy, nutritious breakfast ready to go on busy mornings.

A cooling rack of freshly baked Pumpkin Apple Oatmeal Cups.

I don’t know about you, but our toddler always wakes up hungry and ready to eat. It seems like we can barely get a clean diaper on her before she’s begging “Food! Food!” Breakfast also so happens to be her favorite meal of the day, and she eats far more in the morning than she does for lunch and dinner, so we always try to have healthy, quick options on hand for her.

We’ve been big fans of baked oatmeal in our household for a while now. I love that it’s jam-packed with nutrients (especially with the right mix-ins) and that it’s handheld, resulting in much less of a mess than classic or even overnight oats make. While traditional baked oatmeals (in baking pans or dishes) are great, turning your baked oatmeal into single-serving cups ups the convenience factor and makes it really easy to only defrost what you need.

Here’s how this easy and tasty recipe is done!

What You Need

The good news is – not much! Most of the ingredients you’ll be using you’ll already have on hand, especially if you’re making this in the fall.

Rolled oats

I love getting the big bags from Trader Joe’s (these ones also happen to be gluten-free if you need that.)

Pumpkin purée

Buy the can OR make your own with this super simple homemade pumpkin purée recipe!

An apple
Milk

Any kind!

An egg
Maple syrup

And pantry staples like…

Baking powder, salt, vanilla extract and pumpkin pie spice

As far as equipment, you’ll just need a cupcake pan (we love these silicone ones *affiliate link*), a couple of bowls, a couple of measuring cups, and a whisk!

An overhead shot of Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal Cups cooling on a rack.

How to Make Baked Oatmeal Cups

Once you get the basic process of these Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal Cups down, you’ll be able to create tons of different variations.

Simply whisk together the dry ingredients, whisk together the wet ingredients, combine the two, and bake. Easy as that!

Other ideas for flavor combinations might be:

Banana and chocolate chip
Sweet potato and orange
Zucchini and raisin
Peanut butter and apple
Cinnamon and berry
Vanilla and peach

The possibilities are endless.

A straight-on look at a freshly baked batch of Pumpkin Apple Oatmeal Cups.

How to Store Baked Oatmeal Cups

Once the cups are baked and cooled, place them in a gallon-size Ziploc and freeze for up to three months.

When you’re ready to serve, simply microwave however many you need for 30 seconds to a minute (maybe more if you’re defrosting a bunch at once.)

Just like my Super Simple Pumpkin Carrot Muffins or my Peanut Butter and Banana Breakfast Cookies, these cups are a great on-the-go option for busy mornings, or even a great travel snack when you’re on the road. 

Read on for the recipe and, if you want to learn more of my tips and tricks for feeding toddlers, be sure you’re signed up for my weekly newsletter!

A stack of Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal Cups leaning against a pitcher of milk.

Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal Cups
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Total Time
35 mins
 

These Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal Cups are baby- and toddler-approved, but great for the whole family! Make them in advance and stick them in the freezer to have a healthy, nutritious breakfast ready to go on busy mornings.

Course: Breakfast, Snack
Cuisine: American
Keyword: after-school, apple, baby-friendly, baby-led weaning, breakfast, freezer-friendly, meal prep, oatmeal, pumpkin, toddler
Servings: 12 people
Calories: 131 kcal
Author: CaliGirl Cooking
Ingredients
  • 3 cups rolled oats
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 1/2 cups milk of your choice (I used unsweetened vanilla almond milk)
  • 1 cup pumpkin purée (Use canned or follow the link in the Recipe Notes to make your own)
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup diced apple
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Spray cupcake pan with cooking spray and set aside.

  2. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together oats, baking powder, salt and pumpkin pie spice.

  3. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together milk, pumpkin purée, maple syrup, egg and vanilla.

  4. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and whisk to combine. Whisk in diced apple.

  5. Using your 1/4 cup measure, scoop mixture into prepared cupcake pan.

  6. Bake at 350 degrees for 18-20 minutes, or until oatmeal is set.

  7. Let cool at least 10 minutes before removing from pan. Let cool completely before transferring to Ziploc for freezer storage.

Recipe Notes
  1. Here's the recipe for homemade pumpkin purée!
  2. These oatmeal cups are baby- and toddler-friendly and are a great breakfast to stash in the freezer. To freeze, place cooled oatmeal cups in a resealable plastic bag and label them (including the date you made them.) These will last in the freezer up to 3 months.
  3. To defrost, microwave for 30 seconds to 1 minute.
  4. Feel free to try other flavor combinations such as: banana-chocolate chip, sweet potato-orange, zucchini-raisin, peanut butter-apple, cinnamon-berry, or vanilla-peach.
Nutrition Facts
Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal Cups
Amount Per Serving
Calories 131 Calories from Fat 27
% Daily Value*
Fat 3g5%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Cholesterol 17mg6%
Sodium 105mg5%
Potassium 184mg5%
Carbohydrates 23g8%
Fiber 3g13%
Sugar 7g8%
Protein 4g8%
Vitamin A 3251IU65%
Vitamin C 1mg1%
Calcium 80mg8%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

28 High-Protein Vegetarian Recipes for Toddlers

Many toddlers are picky when it comes to eating meat, even if they’re not on a vegetarian diet. Here is an ultimate roundup of high-protein vegetarian recipes for toddlers, featuring quinoa, beans and lentils as primary ingredients.

When it comes to toddlers’ picky eating habits, one of the food groups I hear most about is meat. Meat can be tricky – it needs to be prepared a certain way that makes it easy for little ones to eat, and the texture can sometimes be offputting. While it’s important to continually expose your child to animal proteins (if your toddler isn’t on a vegetarian diet), there are tons of other ways to ensure your babe is getting this vital nutrient.

Here’s a roundup of 28 fantastic high-protein vegetarian recipes for toddlers, broken down by meal. Seriously, though, there is so much inspiration here! And if you want more tips on how to deal with a picky eater, check out these 9 Easy Ways to Combat Picky Eating in Toddlers.

Without further ado…

BREAKFAST

1. PB&J Quinoa Bowl

Just hold the crunchy almond slivers!

Two PB&J Quinoa Breakfast Bowls complete with toppings, sitting atop striped dish towels.
by CaliGirl Cooking
2. quinoa berry breakfast bowl instant pot
An overhead shot of two Quinoa Berry Breakfast Bowls.
by Green Scheme
3. quinoa blender pancakes
by The Saucy Fig
4. 5 Ingredient eggy quinoa cups
A pan of 5-Ingredient Eggy Quinoa Cups.
by Kidgredients
5. crispy vegan waffles with lentil protein
A plate of Crispy Vegan Waffles with Lentil Protein topped with berries and powdered sugar.
by My Pure Plants

LUNCH

6. baked zucchini, feta and Quinoa Bites
A board full of quinoa bites.
by Whole Food Bellies
7. broccoli cheddar quinoa bars
A stack of two broccoli cheddar quinoa bars.
by Served From Scratch
8. lentil falafel with lime yogurt
A cast iron pan of lentil falafel with lime yogurt dip.
by Greedy Gourmet
9. Veggie Bean Burger
A close-up shot of a veggie burger.
by Spice Cravings
10. easy 15-minute quinoa bites with peas
A stack of 5-ingredient quinoa bites.
by Bite-Sized Kitchen
11. black bean salad with avocado
A bowl of Black Bean Salad with Avocado.
by Dancing Through the Rain

SNACKS

12. roasted cauliflower hummus with rosemary and garlic
Roasted Cauliflower Hummus with Rosemary & Garlic | CaliGirl Cooking
by CaliGirl Cooking
13. easy basil lentil dip
A close-up shot of a bowl of Easy Basil Lentil Dip surrounded by chips.
by The Missing Lokness
14. lemon tahini lentil hummus
An overhead shot of a bowl of Lemon Tahini Lentil Hummus surrounded by fresh rosemary and lemons.
by Bucket List Tummy
15. 5-Minute pumpkin curry hummus
This 5-Minute Pumpkin Curry Hummus takes your average Mediterranean dip and kicks it up a notch with a ton of added flavor. The perfect appetizer or side dish for your next dinner party!
by CaliGirl Cooking
16. kid-friendly quinoa fritters
An overhead shot of a bowl of quinoa fritters with a bowl of marinara dipping sauce.
by Wendy Polisi

DINNER

17. goat cheese quinoa and broccoli casserole in the instant pot
An overhead shot of a bowl of Goat Cheese, Quinoa and Broccoli Casserole.
by Whole Food Bellies
18. vegan white bean mac-and-cheese
A bowl of Vegan White Bean Mac and Cheese with fresh vegetables.
by Rhian’s Recipes
19. pasta e fagioli
A spoonful of pasta e fagioli.
by Christina’s Cucina
20. Instant Pot Lentil Stroganoff
An overhead shot of Instant Pot Lentil Stroganoff.
by Nourish Nutrition Co.
21. enchilada quinoa casserole
A finished dish of Enchilada Quinoa Casserole.
by My Kitchen Love
22. cheesy lentil bake
A finished pan of Cheesy Lentil Bake.
by Love In My Oven
23. one-pot black-eyed peas and spinach rice in instant pot
A bowl full of Black-Eyed Peas and Spinach Rice.
by Piping Pot Curry
24. 15-minute lentil sloppy joe stuffed sweet potatoes
A Lentil Sloppy Joe stuffed sweet potato ready to be devoured.
by Lemons and Zest
25. lentil pizza crust
A sliced pizza featuring Lentil Pizza Crust.
by This Healthy Kitchen
26. lentil tacos
A plate full of Mexican Lentil Tacos.
by Recipes From a Pantry

TREATS

27. Healthy quinoa almond date truffles
A plate of Quinoa Almond Date Truffles.
by Ministry of Curry
28. oatmeal quinoa chocolate chip cookies
A gooey quinoa chocolate chip cookie broken in half.
by Served From Scratch

If you have or come across any other great high-protein vegetarian recipes for toddlers, please let me know about them in the comments below! xo

How to Do a Food Segue With Your Toddler

A “food segue” is a great way to get your picky toddler used to foods and flavors that he or she won’t normally eat. Here’s your step-by-step guide for how to do it!

Toddler eating celery on a kitchen counter, title image.

I hear it all the time from all you mamas out there, “I wish I could get my toddler to eat [fill in the blank]!” One- to three-year-olds are notoriously picky eaters, and getting them to eat certain foods can be a never-ending battle. After all, this is the age when they start to realize (and assert) their own independence, and testing the limits is a huge part of that. Luckily, there are certain things you can do to minimize the struggle and, yes, get your toddler to eat foods that he or she has turned his or her nose up at in the past.

If you’re curious about some of the other tips I’ve shared in regards to feeding toddlers, be sure to check out my past posts on the best ways to introduce NEW foods and things NOT to say, but today I’m going to tell you about one super-effective method for working those historically unfavored foods into your little one’s diet, and that’s with a food segue! Using this method, you’ll start with a food your toddler already really enjoys, and work just a little bit of whatever new food you want to get your toddler used to into it. Then, you’ll slowly increase the amount of the new food – using a couple of different meal preparations – until eventually your toddler is eating the new food on its own without batting an eye.

Don’t worry, I’m going to get to a couple of examples in just a minute, but before that, there are a few things you’ll want to remember.

Things to Remember with Food Segueing

It’s a slow process.

It’s not all going to happen overnight. It may take days, weeks, or months to get your toddler to eat the new food. The idea is to slowly work it in, and only move onto the next step once you’ve succeeded with whatever step you’re on.

You’re going to need to be creative.

Toddlers love novelty, so the more creative you get with your segue, the more successful you’ll be. You’ll need to put on your thinking cap to serve the new food in dishes that are not only already well-liked, but also lend themselves well to whatever the new food is. More on this in the examples, but if you’re ever stuck with how to segue something, feel free to drop me a line!

Consider any other factors at play – and don’t get frustrated!

When working on a food segue, it’s important to remember that other factors can play a part in your toddler’s eating success. If you’re introducing a food segue dish, it’s helpful to also observe things like how tired your toddler is, if they’re teething, perhaps not feeling well or having a bad day. If any of these factors are limiting your toddler’s success, try the same segue again another day.

How to Do a Food Segue

Let’s talk about how a food segue is done. I think the easiest way to show you how is with examples, so that’s what I’ve got for you. I’ve got two examples for you (only one example with photos) but I’m going to show them to you side-by-side so you get the idea of how you can segue with two very different foods. Because most mamas express trouble getting their toddlers to eat (1) vegetables or (2) protein, we’re going to talk about segueing into carrots and turkey, respectively.

STEP 1

Okay, so your goal is to get your toddler to eat carrots. First, you’ll want to think of something that he or she already loves that you could mix a small amount of carrots into that your little one will hardly be able to taste. Let’s say an orange-carrot smoothie. If your babe drinks the smoothie down no problem, you’re ready to move on to Step 2. If not, wait a few days and try again.

An overhead shot of two orange-carrot smoothies in Mason jars.
TOP: Orange-Carrot Smoothie, light carrots BOTTOM: Orange-Carrot Smoothie, heavier carrots

For turkey, let’s say your toddler already LOVES pasta with red sauce. A great first step here would be mixing a small amount of ground turkey into the red sauce.

STEP 2

For the next step in the segue, you’re going to want to make the same smoothie, just up the amount of carrots involved. This will impart more of the carrot-y taste on your toddler’s palate, but will be a bit easier on them since they’re already used to (and enjoying) the way you’re serving it. Just as in Step 1, if your little downs this without a problem, move on to Step 2. If not, try again in a few days.

For the turkey, you’ll want to once again serve the pasta with red sauce, but simply increase the amount of ground meat in the sauce.

STEP 3

Time to move onto a new preparation! Hopefully, by now your toddler has gotten a little more used to the taste of carrots. Since we blended carrots into a smoothie for the last two steps, let’s try mixing carrots into something in their more natural form. I know most toddlers love grilled cheese, so let’s make the next preparation a grilled cheese with some shredded carrots mixed into the shredded cheese. This is great because carrots and cheddar cheese are the same color. Also, the cheese and the carrots are prepared in the same way – shredded – which will make them more easily blend together. As always, keep trying this preparation every few days until you see some success. And feel free to mix in some Orange-Carrot Smoothies on the days in between!

With the turkey example, a great next step would be serving pasta with diced tomatoes and ground turkey (rather than the tomato and turkey mixed together in a sauce). This gets your toddler used to seeing the ground turkey on its own while still having all of the same flavors as the first two preparations.

STEP 4

Now that your kiddo is hooked on grilled cheese and carrot sandwiches, the next step would be to take the cheese and carrot combo OUT of the sandwich, and just serve grated carrots covered in melted cheese.

Enough with the ground turkey already, time to move onto sliced turkey breast. BUT we’re still going to keep some similar flavors and – instead of serving the turkey with pasta and red sauce – we’re going to serve it with ketchup to dip it in! Because what kid doesn’t like ketchup? Or dip?!

STEP 5

Okay, time to move on from the cheesy stuff. The next step would be to serve the grated carrots with an alternative dip or topping, like ranch dressing or hummus. Use your judgment as to what your kiddo will like best.

Clockwise from top left: a grilled cheese in the shape of a heart, grated carrots with melted cheese on top, grated carrots with ranch dressing, carrot sticks with ranch dressing.
Clockwise from top left: Clockwise from top left: a grilled cheese in the shape of a heart, grated carrots with melted cheese on top, grated carrots with ranch dressing, carrot sticks with ranch dressing.

As far as the turkey goes, it’s time to see if your toddler is ready for the full segue and serve turkey breast on its own!

(OPTIONAL) STEP 6

Chances are, if you’ve gotten this far, you’re probably already pretty happy with the strides your toddler has taken in learning to like a new food. But if you want to take it even further with the carrots, the next step would be serving them as sticks with the same ranch dressing.

Most food segues won’t take more than five or six steps, but of course, there may be instances where you’ll be fine with fewer or need to add a few more – use your best judgment!

Perhaps most importantly, don’t forget about a food you’ve segued once you’ve gotten your child to eat it. Keep exposing him or her fairly regularly, so he or she doesn’t forget all of these new taste associations.  And keep experimenting! Your child may surprise you with what they’ll eat if you keep exposing him or her to new things.

And if you’d like even more tips on how to deal with a toddler who’s a picky eater, be sure you grab my free download with sooooo many more tips and tricks!

Six different stages of serving carrots in food to introduce new flavors to your toddler.

4 Things NOT to Say When Speaking to Your Toddler About Food

When it comes to feeding toddlers, what you SAY can have just as much of an impact on how they eat as what you do or serve. Here’s a list of four things NOT to say when speaking to your toddler about food to set him or her up for success right now and in the future.

Title image for 4 Things NOT to Say to Your Toddler When Speaking About Food.

If you’re a parent, you know it. Feeding toddlers is tricky with a capital “T”. Chances are that at one point or another your toddler has wanted to eat the same three things over and over again, and/or has completely refused to eat anything of any nutritional value, and/or has liked something one second only to loudly exclaim “no like” the next. It’s a tough road to navigate, and it takes a lot of psychological manipulation to successfully do so.

That’s right, today I’m here telling you to psychologically manipulate your child. It sounds strange to flat out say it like that, but it’s the truth. What we say to our toddlers now when it comes to food and eating will lay the foundation for not only their current eating habits, but their relationship with food in the future. It’s just as important, if not more so, than HOW we feed them or WHAT we feed them.

Having studied psychology – and having gone through my own rocky relationship with food – I’ve made it my mission to raise my daughter to have the healthiest, most positive relationship with eating that she can. This means countless hours studying the research, perfecting my own relationship with food, and practicing all that I’ve learned with my little girl. Throughout everything, I’ve been able to glean what really works and what doesn’t when it comes to speaking to your toddler about food, and that’s what I’m here to share with you!

A toddler sitting on a kitchen counter eating blueberries with a quizzical look on her face.

Read on to learn the four things to watch out for when speaking about food with your littles, along with ways to rephrase what you say for optimal results:

Presenting things as “black and white”

One of the main things you want to watch out for when speaking to your toddler about food is presenting it as “healthy” or “unhealthy” or “good for you” or “bad for you.” This presents things as more “black and white” or “yes” or “no” to your child, where the real goal is to teach him or her balance and everything in moderation.

Rather than using these phrases, try focusing on other aspects of food and eating, like how the food tastes, how it makes our bodies feel, or how the food looks.

Some examples of this would be:

“Mmmm don’t these mashed sweet potatoes taste nice and creamy?”

“Doesn’t this broccoli make you feel strong?”

“How fun are all these colors on our plate? Are they making a rainbow?”

Your own negative self-talk

Toddlers are sponges, and they absorb more than we think. Be mindful of how you speak about your own body image or eating habits when you’re around your toddler, because it will most certainly rub off on him or her. Never make comments in front of them about needing to lose weight or not being able to eat something because it’s not on your diet, or saying you need to lose 10 pounds before you can wear a bikini. In a similar vein, be wary of your comments about THEIR size.

Here are some great POSITIVE examples of things you could say instead:

“I love eating lots of fruits and vegetables because they make me feel happy and energized.”

“Let’s put on our swimsuits and go swimming!”

“You’re so strong!”

A toddler and mom baking together at the kitchen counter.

Forcing

I talk about it a lot, but forcing your child to eat something will only lead to resentment and resistance and potentially set them up for disordered eating in the future. The secret is to continuously introduce new and different foods to your toddler, while allowing him or her the autonomy to choose what he or she will or won’t eat. If you offer enough healthy options, your little one will find SOMETHING he or she loves. Perhaps the greatest way to overcome the feeling of needing to force is to lead by example! If your child sees you eating healthy food on the regular, he or she will want to do the same (see my above note about toddlers being sponges).

Dwelling on the negative

Perhaps one of the biggest things we can avoid when communicating with our toddlers about food (and related to #4) is dwelling on the negative. Don’t focus on what they didn’t eat, or how little they ate. Instead, celebrate the wins and encourage positive behavior! If your child tastes something they’ve never tried before, let them know how proud you are of them. If they ate a well-rounded meal, exclaim to them how good they must feel. Kids love positive reinforcement, so dole that stuff out on the regular.

This is just my quick summary of what NOT to say or do when speaking to your toddler about food, but there’s a lot more where that came from! If you want to learn more about feeding your little one, click here for my free cheat sheet on dealing with picky eaters AND to get on the list to be notified when my next Feeding Toddlers: Unlocked! comprehensive course kicks off. I can’t wait to see you there!

A mama holding her toddler in the kitchen and giving her a big kiss.