Coconut Passion Fruit Chia Pudding Parfait

This Coconut Passion Fruit Chia Pudding Parfait is just as suitable as a healthy dessert as it is as a wholesome breakfast. Coconut milk chia pudding, thick passion fruit puree and homemade haupia all come together in a single dish. You won’t be able to stop eating this tasty treat!

Two dishes of Coconut Passion Fruit Chia Pudding Parfait topped with pink flowers.

One of my favorite parts about traveling is finding new foods and dishes that inspire me to get in the kitchen and create my own special version of them. On any typical vacation, I’ll probably come home with at least two ideas of recipes I want to recreate on my own. It’s one of the reasons I love traveling so much – there’s nothing like it to broaden my imagination and get my home-cooking skills flowing again as soon as I get home.

If you’ve been following me on Instagram, chances are you noticed we took a little trip to visit my cousin and her new baby in Kauai at the end of July. While the great majority of our vacation was spent hanging out in our beautiful vacation rental and lounging by the pool with our babes, we did manage to get out for a few tasty treats.

There’s a small local market close to where we stay in Poipu that, while not fancy, is perhaps best known for the shave ice “wagon” that parks out front of it or the sushi bar inside of it. We stopped in for some Spam musubi one day on our way home from the beach, and my cousin came out with a Mason jar full of what looked to me like the dreamiest (and tastiest) chia pudding concoction I’d ever seen in my life:

A Mason jar of coconut chia pudding layered with haupia and passion fruit puree.

Coconut chia pudding was layered in between passion fruit puree and creamy haupia, and as soon as I tasted a bite of it I casually informed her that she better eat however much of it that she wanted FAST, because otherwise I would 😉

Lucky for me (and for little Raia, who couldn’t get enough of it!) she was more than generous with sharing and I was able to savor each bite just enough so I’d remember how to make my own at home. Lucky for you, I’m sharing that homemade recipe with you today!

There are a few things that go into this Coconut Passion Fruit Chia Pudding Parfait, but no step is too difficult. Just remember that you’ll want to start the process a day before you want to serve it, as both the haupia and the chia pudding need to set up in the fridge overnight. It’s also good to give the passion fruit puree some time to set up in the fridge since you’ll be heating it thicken it up.

Here’s how the process goes:

Step 1: Make the haupia.

Full disclosure, this was the first time I’d made haupia from scratch, and I was blown away by how easy it was! I used this recipe from Tasting Table, which involves just four ingredients:

Cornstarch
Water
Coconut milk
Sugar

It’s a quick and easy process, just boil everything together, pour it into a baking dish and refrigerate overnight. No baking or fancy temperature taking required. You can also find haupia mix packets in Asian grocery stores (or on Amazon [*affiliate link]), but after making this from-scratch recipe, I’ll tell you I never feel the need to buy the packets again!

Looking down on a dish of Coconut Passion Fruit Chia Pudding topped with coconut chips and a pink flower.

Step 2: Make the chia pudding.

If you’ve never made chia pudding before, prepare to meet your new favorite make-ahead breakfast. All it takes is some chia seeds, coconut beverage (or milk of your choice) and some vanilla and honey. Pour everything into a Mason jar, shake and seal, then place this in your refrigerator overnight as well. Are we seeing how easy this is yet?

Step 3: Thicken up (and sweeten) some passion fruit puree.

I know, I know, you’re probably wondering where in the heck you’re going to find some passion fruit puree. But I’ve made it easy for you! You can order it on Amazon [*affiliate link], and it’s even on Prime so it will be at your doorstep in just a couple of days.

We were lucky enough to have some passion fruit puree in our freezer from a family friend that grows them, so I simply thawed that but then thickened it up on the stove with some cornstarch and a little extra sugar for sweetness. I highly recommend giving whatever puree you end up getting a taste before doing this, and only adding sugar as needed.

Step 4: Assemble, top with toasted coconut flakes and enjoy!

The next morning, your parfaits will be ready in seconds. Simply take your serving vessel (I like small Mason jars or clear parfait dishes) and start layering:

First goes the coconut chia pudding,
Then goes the passion fruit puree,
Followed by cubes of your homemade haupia,
All topped with roasted coconut strips to add the perfect crunch.

An overhead shot of a wooden spoon resting in a dish of coconut chia pudding.

If you’re looking for a special kid-friendly breakfast treat that still packs a ton of nutrition, this Coconut Passion Fruit Chia Pudding Parfait is the answer.

And if coconut and/or passion fruit aren’t your thing, check out some of my other tasty chia pudding recipes like this Tropical Matcha Chia Pudding, this Coconut-Vanilla Chia Pudding Parfait, and this baby-friendly Oat Milk Chia Pudding with Blueberry Orange Compote!

Coconut Passion Fruit Chia Pudding Parfait
Prep Time
30 mins
Refrigerator Time
8 hrs
Total Time
8 hrs 30 mins
 

This Coconut Passion Fruit Chia Pudding Parfait is just as suitable as a healthy dessert as it is as a wholesome breakfast. Coconut milk chia pudding, thick passion fruit puree and homemade haupia all come together in a single dish. You won’t be able to stop eating this tasty treat!

Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: Hawaiian
Keyword: breakfast, chia, coconut, dairy-free, dessert, Hawaiian, healthy, kid-friendly, passion fruit, snack
Servings: 4 people
Calories: 570 kcal
Author: CaliGirl Cooking
Ingredients
  • 2 cups diced haupia pudding Link to recipe in Notes
  • 1/2 cup chia seeds
  • 2 cups unsweetened vanilla coconut beverage
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/4 cups passion fruit puree Link to purchase in Notes
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 6 tablespoons water
  • Sugar, as needed to sweeten
  • Roasted coconut chips, for topping
Instructions
  1. The night before you plan to serve the parfaits, prepare the haupia according to directions and allow to set up in the refrigerator overnight.

  2. The same night, combine chia seeds, coconut beverage and vanilla in a glass bowl with a lid and place in the refrigerator. If you can, give the bowl a shake a few times before bed to make sure the seeds are well incorporated with the coconut beverage. 

  3. You’ll also want to prepare the passion fruit puree the night before. Place the puree in a saucepan and bring to a gentle simmer. In a small, separate bowl, whisk together the cornstarch and water, then whisk into the passion fruit puree. Continuously whisk as you add however much sugar you need, probably a few tablespoons but taste as you go. Remove puree from heat and let cool before transferring to a Mason jar or other container and refrigerating overnight.

  4. In the morning, scoop chia pudding into your serving vessels, then top with passion fruit puree, then the diced haupia. Top with toasted coconut chips and enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Dish Density: Medium

Haupia pudding recipe from Tasting Table.

Passion fruit puree link to purchase [*affiliate]

4 Things NOT to Say When Speaking to Your Toddler About Food

When it comes to feeding toddlers, what you SAY can have just as much of an impact on how they eat as what you do or serve. Here’s a list of four things NOT to say when speaking to your toddler about food to set him or her up for success right now and in the future.

Title image for 4 Things NOT to Say to Your Toddler When Speaking About Food.

If you’re a parent, you know it. Feeding toddlers is tricky with a capital “T”. Chances are that at one point or another your toddler has wanted to eat the same three things over and over again, and/or has completely refused to eat anything of any nutritional value, and/or has liked something one second only to loudly exclaim “no like” the next. It’s a tough road to navigate, and it takes a lot of psychological manipulation to successfully do so.

That’s right, today I’m here telling you to psychologically manipulate your child. It sounds strange to flat out say it like that, but it’s the truth. What we say to our toddlers now when it comes to food and eating will lay the foundation for not only their current eating habits, but their relationship with food in the future. It’s just as important, if not more so, than HOW we feed them or WHAT we feed them.

Having studied psychology – and having gone through my own rocky relationship with food – I’ve made it my mission to raise my daughter to have the healthiest, most positive relationship with eating that she can. This means countless hours studying the research, perfecting my own relationship with food, and practicing all that I’ve learned with my little girl. Throughout everything, I’ve been able to glean what really works and what doesn’t when it comes to speaking to your toddler about food, and that’s what I’m here to share with you!

A toddler sitting on a kitchen counter eating blueberries with a quizzical look on her face.

Read on to learn the four things to watch out for when speaking about food with your littles, along with ways to rephrase what you say for optimal results:

Presenting things as “black and white”

One of the main things you want to watch out for when speaking to your toddler about food is presenting it as “healthy” or “unhealthy” or “good for you” or “bad for you.” This presents things as more “black and white” or “yes” or “no” to your child, where the real goal is to teach him or her balance and everything in moderation.

Rather than using these phrases, try focusing on other aspects of food and eating, like how the food tastes, how it makes our bodies feel, or how the food looks.

Some examples of this would be:

“Mmmm don’t these mashed sweet potatoes taste nice and creamy?”

“Doesn’t this broccoli make you feel strong?”

“How fun are all these colors on our plate? Are they making a rainbow?”

Your own negative self-talk

Toddlers are sponges, and they absorb more than we think. Be mindful of how you speak about your own body image or eating habits when you’re around your toddler, because it will most certainly rub off on him or her. Never make comments in front of them about needing to lose weight or not being able to eat something because it’s not on your diet, or saying you need to lose 10 pounds before you can wear a bikini. In a similar vein, be wary of your comments about THEIR size.

Here are some great POSITIVE examples of things you could say instead:

“I love eating lots of fruits and vegetables because they make me feel happy and energized.”

“Let’s put on our swimsuits and go swimming!”

“You’re so strong!”

A toddler and mom baking together at the kitchen counter.

Forcing

I talk about it a lot, but forcing your child to eat something will only lead to resentment and resistance and potentially set them up for disordered eating in the future. The secret is to continuously introduce new and different foods to your toddler, while allowing him or her the autonomy to choose what he or she will or won’t eat. If you offer enough healthy options, your little one will find SOMETHING he or she loves. Perhaps the greatest way to overcome the feeling of needing to force is to lead by example! If your child sees you eating healthy food on the regular, he or she will want to do the same (see my above note about toddlers being sponges).

Dwelling on the negative

Perhaps one of the biggest things we can avoid when communicating with our toddlers about food (and related to #4) is dwelling on the negative. Don’t focus on what they didn’t eat, or how little they ate. Instead, celebrate the wins and encourage positive behavior! If your child tastes something they’ve never tried before, let them know how proud you are of them. If they ate a well-rounded meal, exclaim to them how good they must feel. Kids love positive reinforcement, so dole that stuff out on the regular.

This is just my quick summary of what NOT to say or do when speaking to your toddler about food, but there’s a lot more where that came from! If you want to learn more about feeding your little one, click here for my free cheat sheet on dealing with picky eaters AND to get on the list to be notified when my next Feeding Toddlers: Unlocked! comprehensive course kicks off. I can’t wait to see you there!

A mama holding her toddler in the kitchen and giving her a big kiss.

5 Tips for Introducing New Foods to Your Toddler

Use these five tips to consistently introduce new foods to your toddler – in a way that will actually get them to eat them! These pointers and strategies will help expand your little one’s palate and turn him or her into a healthy, adventurous eater for life.

5 Tips for Introducing New Foods to Your Toddler Title Graphic

Ohhhh feeding toddlers. The never-ending challenge. In fact, I don’t know if I’ve ever met a mama who doesn’t have at least one thing she’d like to change about her toddler’s eating habits. You’re not alone! It happens to everyone. Heck, I’ve spent the better part of a year consuming all of the research and techniques under the sun for this and I STILL sometimes wish my toddler would just eat whatever I give her with no resistance or complaint.

But there are a lot of things I HAVE learned in all of my research that have made the adventure of feeding my toddler just a little bit easier, and I’m sharing my top five tips with you today! Read on to learn some of the best ways to introduce new foods to your little one.

And if you’re ready to start introducing new foods but feel you need some accountability partners, I’d love for you to sign up for my Three New Foods Challenge. In this challenge, I personally walk a small group through the entire process of introducing three new foods over the course of a few weeks via a private Facebook group. It’s so much fun and is a great way to stay accountable (and meet some other mamas in the process.) Click here to learn more!

Now, let’s get on with these tips

Tip #1: If at first you don’t succeed, keep trying

If you introduce a new food to your toddler and he or she refuses it, don’t give up! Toddlers are discovering their newfound autonomy and will often go through phases of refusing something “just because.” Continue to introduce a new food at least once a week – perhaps prepared a bit differently (see #2) – and you may find that your toddler eventually comes around. To put things into perspective, it can take 30-40 exposures to a certain food before a toddler will eat it!

Tip #2: Try the same food prepared a different way

If your toddler refuses a food once, try preparing it in a slightly different way the next time you serve it. For example, if your little one isn’t into mashed sweet potatoes, try serving them as fries with a “dip” the next time, or prepare the sweet potatoes with different spices. Toddlers are into novelty, so anything that’s “new” and “exciting” to them is more likely to be a hit. Flex your creativity muscles!

A toddler enjoying a healthy lunch.

Tip #3: Serve the new food with a food they already love

If you have a toddler, chances are he or she is obsessed with one food or another. Use this to your advantage and work a new food into the food he or she already loves! Ease into it slowly, baby steps are great. For example, if your child loves grilled cheese and you want to get him or her to eat carrots, try throwing a few grated carrots into the grilled cheese the next time you make it. Don’t go overboard, remember, baby steps! Once they eat the little bit of grated carrots in the grilled cheese, you can slowly increase the amount. When your child is into eating carrots this way, try next serving grated carrots on their own but covered with melty cheese. If this continues to be successful, slowly ease off of the cheese at each serving. Before you know it, your little one will likely be ready to eat grated carrots on their own.

Tip #4: Model the desired behavior

We all know it – kids at this age are little sponges! That’s why, if you’re trying to get your toddler to eat a wider variety of foods, it’s important that you lead by example. If you want your little one to eat broccoli, be sure they see you eating broccoli. If you want him or her to not think twice about eating a tomato, let them see you eating tomatoes. Your toddler will eventually want to mimic you!

Tip #5: Don’t react negatively if they don’t like something

If your toddler tastes something and doesn’t like it, or flat out refuses a new food, be sure not to have a negative reaction. Forcing a certain item or speaking negatively to your little one about food will only foster resentment and rebellion, and may also cause your child to grow up with a negative reaction (in general) to eating. The important thing is to continue introducing things and modeling the desired behavior, without worrying so much about your little one actually clearing his or her plate.

A mama and toddler giggling at each other after a delicious meal!

I know how challenging it can be to get your toddler to try new foods (speaking from experience), so I hope these tips were helpful to you and gave you the extra boost of confidence you need to get in the kitchen and whip up something new and exciting for your little one. If you’re stuck in a rut and need some ideas when it comes to new foods to introduce to your toddler, be sure to check out my favorites for 12- and 18-month olds, plus my post on Creative Baby and Toddler Lunch Ideas!

I’d love to hear how these strategies worked for you in the comments below, and don’t forget to click here to learn more about my Three New Foods Challenge if you’re looking for a little extra support and motivation! Xoxo

How to Manage the Baby-Led Weaning Mess

Want to try baby-led weaning but nervous about the mess? These tips and products will help you streamline the clean-up process and make baby-led weaning a fun and enjoyable process or everyone.

Learn how to manage the baby-led weaning mess!
*This post contains affiliate links.

As new moms, it can be awfully difficult to condone any sort of activity for our little one that will result in yet another mess. We’re all stretched so thin as it is, juggling too many responsibilities at once and trying to fit as much as we can into our day.

If you’re at all familiar with baby-led weaning (and if you’re not, click here), you know that it comes with its fair share of messes. Given the load us mamas are already bearing, this can be a huge drawback when it comes to deciding how we want to introduce solid foods to our little one. But it doesn’t have to be!

We have been so happy with the results of baby-led weaning for our little one that I’ll happily say it was well worth every single mess we had to clean up. That being said, we did learn a thing or two in the process about efficient clean-up, and this is what I’m sharing with you today.

Even if you didn’t go the baby-led weaning route, you’ve likely faced (or will be likely to face) a huge mealtime clean-up at some point in time, and these tips will help you too!

A toddler self-feeding herself a smoothie bowl in her high chair.

I’ve got a ton of other resources for baby-led weaning here on the blog, but I’ll just quickly explain WHY things get extra-messy with BLW and then we’ll get on to my (very) well-tested tips and tricks for cleaning.

WHY IS BABY-LED WEANING SO MESSY?

One of the main reasons baby-led weaning is so messy is because it highly encourages your child to start feeding him- or herself from the get-go. This includes grabbing onto finger foods, using utensils, and sipping from a cup from a very early age. The thought is that this enables your little one to better explore his or her food and learn to be self-sufficient. It also allows you to enjoy your meal at the same time as them.

As you can imagine, there’s a bit of a learning curve involved. It takes some time for your little one to get the hang of things, which can lead to some huge messes in the meantime.

Once you read these tips and get into a routine, clean-up will become a snap and it will no longer be something you dread. Let’s get into it!

TOP TIPS AND TRICKS FOR MANAGING THE BLW MESS

1. Invest in a “splat mat”

This is by far one of the best investments we made when embarking on our baby-led weaning journey with our little one. There are a ton of “splat mats” out there, which are simply plastic floor tarps that you place under your baby’s highchair to catch food and liquids. Not only do splat mats help protect your floors, they’re easy to wipe up and can just be removed and shaken out if there are only loose crumbs. My main hesitancy in getting a splat mat was that I wouldn’t be able to find one that would fit in with our decor (we have a huge open floor plan so all of our common area rooms run together) but I managed to find a not-so-offensive clear one like this that we have absolutely loved. There are a ton of inexpensive options out there, though, so you’re sure to find one that works for you.

2. Get a few full-coverage, easy-to-clean bibs

Bibs are another thing that can be a game-changer when it comes to dealing with the baby-led weaning mess. A lot of BLW moms love these silicone ones with the catch-all at the bottom, but I fell in love with these super cute Bapron Baby aprons that are easy to clean and come in tons of fun prints (not to mention they’re about as full-coverage as you can get.) Be sure to stock up on a few, though, because you’ll want to rinse them out or run them through the wash when they get messy.

3. Don’t be afraid to strip your chid down

Afraid the after-effects of a meal are going to completely ruin your little one’s outfit? Don’t be afraid to strip them down! Sure, you may want to avoid this when you’re out in public, but it’s an easy thing to do when you’re in the comfort of your own home. I still do this with my toddler when I know something she’s eating – I’m looking at you, popsicles! – is going to be particularly messy.

4. Get an easy-to-clean highchair

Let me tell you, those cushion-y, complicated highchairs are a nightmare to clean. If you don’t want to be disassembling and running a load of laundry after every meal, get an easy-to-clean highchair! After a ton of research, we purchased the Ikea Antilop highchair for our little one and were incredibly happy with it. I had even ordered the cushion insert you can get for it, but stopped using it after about a week because it was a pain to clean. The Antilop is not only super-easy to wipe down after every meal, it’s super cheap at less than $30 (if you purchase from Ikea). Can’t go wrong with that!

5. Stock up on microfiber cloths

I don’t know about you, but I hate making unnecessary waste. It only took us a few meals of going through our fair share of paper towels before I decided to stock up on a ton of microfiber cloths to use when cleaning up the BLW mess. These are great for not only cleaning the eating area, but also your little one’s face and hands (and anywhere else on their body that the mess may have reached.)  We probably have about 15 cloths in a folded stack in our kitchen that we cycle through. Simply throw any dirty ones in the wash anytime you’re doing a load!

6. Use eco-friendly disinfecting wipes

As much as I like minimizing waste, there are times when a microfiber cloth just won’t cut it. When this happens, we reach for our Seventh Generation disinfecting wipes. I love that these are still eco-friendly and safe for our babe as well. We use them to do a deeper clean on the highchair and to wipe down the splat mat on a regular basis.

7. Get a dog

Okay, I know you’re probably not going to go out and get a dog JUST for this reason, but I’d be lying if I said our pup didn’t make our baby-led weaning clean-up process a whole lot easier. Of course, we always monitor what’s on the ground before letting her eat (so she doesn’t eat anything that might make her sick) AND we make her wait to eat until after our little one is done. This helps prevent her from begging at the table and interrupting our – and our little one’s – meal. If you have a dog already, see if he or she might be willing to help pitch in with the cleaning! (I’m going to venture to say they’ll be more than happy to oblige.)

Dogs are a great way to manage the baby-led weaning mess!

So there you have it! My top tips and tricks for managing the baby-led weaning mess. I’d love to hear if you have any tips of your own that have been useful in the clean-up process. Let me know in the comments below!

Top 5 Favorite Foods for 10-Month-Olds

Here is a list of some favorite foods for 10-month-olds on their baby-led weaning journey, including recipes and directions for how to prepare each one!

Title graphic for 5 favorite foods for 10-month-olds.

I’m sure by now you’re a pro at feeding your little one and baby-led weaning in general, but I know we all could use some inspiration here and there. You know by now some of the best foods for 6- and 8-month-olds, but here are some new things to try with your 10-month-old.

#1 PEANUT BUTTER TOAST, FRENCH TOAST, OR TOAST OF ANY KIND

I don’t think I have yet to meet a 10-month-old who doesn’t like some sort of toast. I think there’s something about bread loaded with delicious toppings (that, of course, can be licked off) that gets a babe excited. You 10-month-old is now used to a variety of foods, and toast can be an exciting upgrade for them as you mesh more than one food together in a meal for him or her. For everyday peanut butter toast, we love Dave’s Killer Bread. We’re also very careful to buy peanut butter that ONLY has peanuts as its ingredients. There are a ton of peanut butters out there that have things like sugar and hydrogenated oils, so be sure you’re reading ingredient lists (Santa Cruz Organics and Trader Joe’s are two of our favorite “clean” brands). [Affiliate links!] Also, be sure you’ve gone through the recommended steps for introducing allergens (which you can learn more about in this bookaffiliate link) before introducing peanut butter to your little one.

Of course, we can’t forget about French toast. It’s easy to lose sight of the nutrients in this classic breakfast, but this recipe for High-Protein Lemon Ricotta French Toast will keep your little one happy for hours!

Two slices of lemon ricotta French toast are stacked on a plate, topped with a pat of butter and drizzled with syrup.

#2 SCRAMBLED EGGS

This is another food you’ll want to be sure you follow the proper introduction strategy for, but once you’ve ruled out an allergy scrambled eggs are a great, protein-packed food for your little one. When we’re not making our meal prep egg cups, we simply scramble Raia an egg in a little bit of high-quality butter (like Kerrygold) and add a touch of cheese (her favorite) and sometimes some baby kale and mushrooms. Eggs are another great way to sneak in some extra veggies for your little one!

A stack of Fiesta Egg Muffins - a great make-ahead snack for 10-month-olds!

#3 SHRIMP

I know I’m recommending a lot of common allergens here, but if you’re following baby-led weaning, you should have a good sense of what your baby is or isn’t allergic to by now. (If you’re not familiar with baby-led weaning, the general premise is to introduce allergens early and often, but one at a time so you know exactly what your little is allergic to if he or she has a reaction.) Raia loved shrimp from an early age. We simply grilled it up on the barbecue with some salt-free garlic-herb seasoning [affiliate link] and then cut it up into bite-size pieces for her. We mostly cut it up because she had no teeth, so if your little one teethes early feel free to try serving it to them whole.

A pile of cooked shrimp on top of a bed of greens. Shrimp is a great food for 10-month-olds as long as they're not allergic!

#4 TRI-TIP OR OTHER THINLY SLICED STEAK/GROUND BEEF

Yes, I know what you’re thinking – BEEF?? But, you guys, Raia loved it soooooo much at this age. And yes, she still had no teeth. Hear me out. Beef is a great source of iron for little ones, and we all know it’s also very high in protein. My husband is a master at cooking tri-tip on the grill, so we simply sliced that up thinly and gave it to her to gnaw on. If cooking tri-tip or another large cut of beef intimidates you, feel free to introduce your little one to ground beef or even baby-size sliders!

A cast iron dish filled with a bed of lettuce and topped with mushroom-beef sliders.

#5 BROCCOLI

I’ll be the first to admit that I was a bit wary of introducing broccoli to Raia, mainly because she didn’t have any teeth at this point. My solution was to cut the florets up into very small pieces, and make sure I gave them a good roast in the oven. Much like other vegetables I’d prep for Raia at this age, I simply dressed them with olive oil and some seasoning (garlic powder, lemon juice and ground coriander are some favorites) and roasted them up in a 400-degree oven for about 20 minutes. I also occasionally steamed the broccoli on the stovetop, but I find roasting lends much more flavor.

A head of broccoli with some chopped florets in the background.

And there you have it! I hope this post was helpful in giving you some ideas and preparation tips for foods for 10-month-olds. If I left anything out, I’d love for you to list it in the comments below!